Vaccination and medicine guide to travel in Nepal

Written by
Vaccination and medicine guide to travel in Nepal

Nepal is one of the top demanding travel destination in Asia due to it’s own unique geographical features,  cultural diversity and historical values. Specially the Nepal is one of the the top destination for mountain lovers and climbing freaks. Seven of the world’s highest mountains are situated in this blessed country (Mt. Everest, Kangchenjunga (both in Nepal and India), Lhotse, Makalu, Cho Oyu, Dhaulagiri, Manaslu, Annapurna).  And tourists, travelers, climbers and many more enthusiasts are visiting Nepal each year.  So if you are planing your next adventure to this country, following vaccination and medicine guide to travel in Nepal will be the one of the must read for your knowledge and health safety. These vaccine and medicine guide was written by following the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) guide lines to travel in Nepal.

Hepatitis A

Hepatitis A

CDC recommends this vaccine because you can get hepatitis A through contaminated food or water in Nepal, regardless of where you are eating or staying. This is the most common vaccine preventable disease that occurs in travelers to less developed areas of the world. It is strongly recommended for travel to Nepal.

Typhoid

Typhoid

Typhoid

You can get typhoid through contaminated food or water in Nepal. CDC recommends this vaccine for most travelers, especially if you are staying with friends or relatives, visiting smaller cities or rural areas, or if you are an adventurous eater.

Rabies

Rabies

rabies

 

Rabies can be found in dogs, bats, and other mammals in Nepal, so CDC recommends this vaccine for the following groups:

  • Travelers involved in outdoor and other activities (such as camping, hiking, biking, adventure travel, and caving) that put them at risk for animal bites.
  • People who will be working with or around animals (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, and researchers).
  • People who are taking long trips or moving to Nepal.

 

Make sure you are up-to-date on routine vaccines. These vaccines include measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine, diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine, varicella (chickenpox) vaccine, polio vaccine, and your yearly flu shot.

Tetanus

Tetanus

Tetanus

Caused by a toxin released by a common dust or soil bacteria which enters the body through a wound.

Diphtheria

This is a bacterial infection of the throat and occasionally the skin. It is found worldwide and is transmitted from person-to-person by coughing and sneezing.

Pertussis (Whooping Cough)

This is a highly infectious respiratory infection responsible for 300,000 deaths annually, mainly in children.

Chickenpox

This very common infectious disease can now be prevented through immunization. Many people miss the disease in childhood only to have a significant illness as an adult. If you do not have history of immunization, a simple blood test can show whether you are at risk. Check with your doctor.

Hepatitis B

You can get hepatitis B through sexual contact, contaminated needles, and blood products, so CDC recommends this vaccine if you might have sex with a new partner, get a tattoo or piercing, or have any medical procedures.

Japanese Encephalitis    

You may need this vaccine if your trip will last more than a month, depending on where you are going in Nepal and what time of year you are traveling. You should also consider this vaccine if you plan to visit rural areas in Nepal or will be spending a lot of time outdoors, even for trips shorter than a month. Your doctor can help you decide if this vaccine is right for you based on your travel plans.

Malaria

When traveling in Nepal, you should avoid mosquito bites to prevent malaria. You may need to take prescription medicine before, during, and after your trip to prevent malaria, depending on your travel plans, such as where you are going, when you are traveling, and if you are spending a lot of time outdoors or sleeping outside. Talk to your doctor about how you can prevent malaria while traveling.

If You Get Sick

Despite your best intentions, it’s still possible you could get sick during your trip or after you return home.

During Your Trip

See a doctor: Seek medical attention as soon as possible. You could simply have a case of traveler’s diarrhea, or you could have a potentially life-threatening disease. You just don’t know until you see a doctor, which is why you have travel insurance.
For traveler’s diarrhea: Drink a lot of fluids to prevent dehydration. Use the oral rehydration salts in your first-aid kit or sports drinks, if available. For severe cases, avoid taking medication to stop diarrhea. This will just keep the bacteria in your system longer and extend your illness.

Back at Home

See your doctor: If you come down with a fever or flu-like illness up to a year after returning from your trip, don’t hesitate to see your doctor. Diseases such as malaria can take up to a year to appear. Make sure to tell your doctor all the countries you’ve visited within the year.

 

Vaccination and medicine guide to travel in Nepal CDC guide can be found here

 

Nepal is one of the top demanding travel destination in Asia due to it's own unique geographical features,  cultural diversity and historical values. Specially the Nepal is one of the the top destination for mountain lovers and climbing freaks. Seven of the world's highest mountains are situated in this blessed country (Mt. Everest, Kangchenjunga (both in Nepal and India), Lhotse, Makalu, Cho Oyu, Dhaulagiri, Manaslu, Annapurna).  And tourists, travelers, climbers and many more enthusiasts are visiting Nepal each year.  So if you are planing your next adventure to this country, following vaccination and medicine guide to travel in Nepal will be the one of the must read for your knowledge and health safety. These vaccine and medicine guide was written by following the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) guide lines to travel in Nepal. Hepatitis A CDC recommends this vaccine because you can get hepatitis A through contaminated food or water in Nepal, regardless of where you are eating or staying. This is the most common vaccine preventable disease that occurs in travelers to less developed areas of the world. It is strongly recommended for travel to Nepal. Typhoid Typhoid You can get typhoid through contaminated food or water in Nepal. CDC recommends this vaccine for most travelers, especially if you are staying with friends or relatives, visiting smaller cities or rural areas, or if you are an adventurous eater. Rabies rabies   Rabies can be found in dogs, bats, and other mammals in Nepal, so CDC recommends this vaccine for the following groups: Travelers involved in outdoor and other activities (such as camping, hiking, biking, adventure travel, and caving) that put them at risk for animal bites. People who will be working with or around animals (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, and researchers). People who are taking long trips or moving to Nepal.   Make sure you are up-to-date on routine vaccines. These vaccines include measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine, diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine, varicella (chickenpox) vaccine, polio vaccine, and your yearly flu shot. Tetanus Tetanus Caused by a toxin released by a common dust or soil bacteria which enters the body through a wound. Diphtheria This is a bacterial infection of the throat and occasionally the skin. It is found worldwide and is transmitted from person-to-person by coughing and sneezing. Pertussis (Whooping Cough) This is a highly infectious respiratory infection responsible for 300,000 deaths annually, mainly in children. Chickenpox This very common infectious disease can now be prevented through immunization. Many people miss the disease in childhood only to have a significant illness as an adult. If you do not have history of immunization, a simple blood test can show whether you are at risk. Check with your doctor. Hepatitis B You can get hepatitis B through sexual contact, contaminated needles, and blood products, so CDC recommends this vaccine if you might have sex with a new partner, get a tattoo or piercing, or have any medical procedures. Japanese Encephalitis     You may need this vaccine if your trip will last…

0

User Rating: 3.8 ( 1 votes)
0

Article Categories:
Destinations · Health · Nepal · Safety

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Show Buttons
Hide Buttons